JEROEN VOGELAAR: Aviation Photographs

Classic aircraft

North American F-86 Sabre

North American F-86F Sabre 52-5385/FU-385 USAF

The North American F-86 Sabre, sometimes called the Sabrejet, was a transonic jet fighter aircraft.

  • Role: Fighter aircraft
  • National origin: United States
  • Manufacturer: North American Aviation
  • First flight: 1 October 1947
  • Introduction: 1949 USAF
  • Retired: 1994, Bolivia
  • Number built: 9,860
  • Variants: CAC Sabre, Canadair Sabre, North American F-86D Sabre and North American FJ-2/-3 Fury

Military operators

  • Argentine Air Force
  • Belgian Air Force
  • Bolivian Air Force
  • Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF)
  • Colombian Air Force
  • Royal Danish Air Force
  • Ethiopian Air Force
  • German Air Force
  • Honduran Air Force
  • Imperial Iranian Air Force
  • Iraqi Air Force
  • Japanese Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF)
  • Royal Netherlands Air Force
  • Royal Norwegian Air Force
  • Pakistani Air Force
  • Peruvian Air Force
  • Philippine Air Force
  • Portuguese Air Force
  • Republic of China Air Force
  • Royal Saudi Air Force
  • South African Air Force
  • Republic of Korea Air Force
  • Spanish Air Force
  • Royal Thai Air Force
  • Tunisian Air Force
  • Turkish Air Force
  • United Nations Operation in the Congo
  • United States Air Force
  • Venezuelan Air Force
  • Yugoslav Air Force

According to the FAA there are 50 privately owned and registered F-86s in the US, including Canadair CL-13 Sabres.

Specifications (F-86F)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 37 ft 1 in (11.4 m)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 0 in (11.3 m)
  • Height: 14 ft 1 in (4.5 m)
  • Wing area: 313.4 sq ft (29.11 m²)
  • Empty weight: 11,125 lb (5,046 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 15,198 lb (6,894 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 18,152 lb (8,234 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × General Electric J47-GE-27 turbojet, 5,910 lbf (maximum thrust at 7,950 lbf for five min)with water injection (26.3 kN)
  • Fuel provisions Internal fuel load: 437 US gallons (1,650 L)), Drop tanks: 2×200 US gallons (760 L) JP-4 fuel

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 687 mph (1,106 km/h) at sea level at 14,212 lb (6,447 kg) combat weight
    also reported 678 mph (1,091 km/h) and 599 at 35,000 feet (11,000 m) at 15,352 pounds (6,960 kg). (597 knots (1,106 km/h) at 6446 m, 1,091 and 964 km/h at 6,960 m.)
  • Stall speed: 124 mph (power off) (108 knots (200 km/h))
  • Range: 1,525 mi, (2,454 km)
  • Service ceiling: 49,600 ft at combat weight (15,100 m)
  • Rate of climb: 9,000 ft/min at sea level (45.72 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 49.4 lb/ft² (236.7 kg/m²)
  • lift-to-drag: 15.1
  • Thrust/weight: 0.38

Armament

  • Guns: 6 X 0.50 in (12.7 mm) M3 Browning machine guns (1,800 rounds in total)
  • Rockets: variety of rocket launchers; e.g: 2 Matra rocket pods with 18 SNEB 68 mm rockets per pod
  • Bombs: 5,300 lb (2,400 kg) of payload on four external hardpoints, bombs were usually mounted on outer two pylons as the inner pairs were plumbed for 2 200 US gallons (760 L) drop tanks which gave the Sabre a more useful range. A wide variety of bombs could be carried (max standard loadout being 2 1,000 lb bombs plus two drop tanks), napalm canisters and could have included a tactical nuclear weapon.

Convair F-102 Delta Dagger

Convair F-102A Delta Dagger 56-1032/FC-032 32ndFS USAF

The Convair F-102 Delta Dagger was an American interceptor aircraft that was built as part of the backbone of the United States Air Force’s air defenses in the late 1950s.

  • Role: Interceptor aircraft
  • National origin: United States
  • Manufacturer: Convair
  • First flight: 24 October 1953
  • Introduction: April 1956
  • Retired: 1979
  • Status: Retired
  • Number built: 1,000
  • Trainer: TF-102A

Military operators

  • Hellenic Air Force (Greece)
  • Turkish Air Force
  • United States Air Force

Specifications (F-102A)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 68 ft 4 in (20.83 m)
  • Wingspan: 38 ft 1 in (11.61 m)
  • Height: 21 ft 2 in (6.45 m)
  • Wing area: 661.5ft²/61.52m² (Original Wing) or 695 ft²/64.57m² (Conically-Cambered Wing) ()
  • Airfoil: NACA 0004-65 mod root and tip
  • Empty weight: 19,350 lb (8,777 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 24,500 lb (11,100 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 31,500 lb (14,300 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney J57-P-25 afterburning turbojet
    • Dry thrust: 11,700 lbf (52.0 kN)
    • Thrust with afterburner: 17,200 lbf (76.5 kN)
  • Internal fuel capacity: 1,085 U.S. gal (4,107 l)
  • External fuel capacity: 2 × 215 U.S. gal (815 l) drop tanks

Performance

  • Maximum speed: Mach 1.25 (825 mph, 1,304 km/h) at 40,000 ft (12,190 m)
  • Range: 1,350 mi (1,170 nmo, 2,175 km)
  • Service ceiling: 53,400 ft (16,300 m)
  • Rate of climb: 13,000 ft/min (66 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 35 lb/ft² (172 kg/m²)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.70

Armament

  • Rockets: 24 × 2.75 in (70 mm) FFAR (Folding Fin Aerial Rocket) unguided rockets in missile bay doors
  • Missiles:
    • 6 × AIM-4 Falcon air-to-air missiles or
    • 3 × AIM-4 Falcon
    • 1 × AIM-26 Falcon with conventional or nuclear warhead

Avionics
MG-10 fire control system

Morane-Saulnier MS.315

Morane-Saulnier MS.317 F-BGUV and F-BCNL

The Morane-Saulnier MS.315 is a primary training monoplane designed and built in France by Morane-Saulnier.

  • Role: Primary trainer
  • National origin: France
  • Manufacturer: Morane-Saulnier
  • First flight: 1932
  • Number built: 356

Variants

  • MS.315 – Production version with a 135hp (101kW) Salmson 9Nc radial engine, 350 built.
  •  MS.315/2 – Higher powered civil version, five built.
  • MS.316 – Variant powered by a Regnier inverted Vee engine, one built.
  • MS.317 -1960s conversions with a 220hp (164kW) Continental W-670K radial engine, 40 converted.

Military operators

  • French Air Force
  • French Navy
  • Peruvian Air Force

Specifications (MS.315)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 7.60 m (24 ft 11¼ in)
  • Wingspan: 12.00 m (39 ft 4½ in)
  • Height: 2.80 m (9 ft 2¼ in)
  • Wing area: 21.60 m2 (232.51 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 548 kg (1208 lb)
  • Gross weight: 860 kg (1896 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Salmson 9Nc radial engine, 101 kW (135 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 170 km/h (106 mph)
  • Service ceiling: 5500 m (18,045 ft)

Yakovlev Yak-11

Let C-11 (Yak-11) F-AZNN/14

The Yakovlev Yak-11 was a trainer aircraft used by the Soviet Air Force and other Soviet-influenced air forces from 1947 until 1962.

  • Role: Fighter
  • National origin: Russia
  • Manufacturer: Yakovlev
  • First flight: 10 November 1945
  • Introduction: 1946
  • Retired: 1962
  • Status: Privately owned, or in museums
  • Number built: 4.566

In total, Soviet production amounted to 3,859 aircraft between 1947 and 1955. with a further 707 licence-built by Let in Czechoslovakia as the C-11.

Military operators

  • Royal Afghan Air Force
  • Albanian Air Force
  • Algerian Air Force
  • National Air Force of Angola
  • Austrian Air Force
  • Bulgarian Air Force
  • China – People’s Liberation Army Air Force
  • Czechoslovak Air Force
  • East German Air Force
  • Egyptian Air Force
  • Iraqi Air Force
  • Hungarian Air Force
  • Mongolian People’s Air Force
  • North Korean Air Force
  • Polish Air Force
  • Romanian Air Force
  • Somali Air Corps
  • Soviet Air Force
  • DOSAAF
  • Syrian Air Force
  • Vietnam People’s Air Force
  • Yemen Air Force

Specifications (Yak-11)

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two – student and instructor
  • Length: 8.20 m (26 ft 10½ in)
  • Wingspan: 9.4 m (30 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 3.28 m (10 ft 5 in)
  • Wing area: 15.40 m² (166 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 1,900 kg (4,189 lb)
  • Loaded weight: kg (lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 2,440 kg (5,379 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Shvetsov ASh-21 air-cooled radial piston engine, 521 kW (700 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 460 km/h (289 mph)
  • Cruise speed: 370 km/h (230 mph)
  • Range: 1250 km (795 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 7,100 m (23,295 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 8.1 m/s (1,600 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 161 kg/m² (32.9 lb/ft²)
  • Power/mass: 0.17 kW/kg (0.10 hp/lb)

Armament

  • 1x nose-mounted machine gun, either 12.7 mm UBS or 7.62 mm ShKAS
  • up to 200 kg (440 lb) of bombs on two underwing racks

Yakovlev Yak-3

Yakovlev Yak-3UA F-AZXZ/4 Soviet Air Force

The Yakovlev Yak-3 was a World War II Soviet fighter aircraft.

  • Role: Fighter
  • National origin: Russia
  • Manufacturer: Yakovlev
  • First flight: 12 April 1941
  • Introduction: 1944
  • Status: Privately owned, or in museums
  • Retired: 1952
  • Number built: 4.848

Yakovlev Yak-3UA F-AZLY/5 Soviet Air Force

Military operators

  • France, Normandie-Niemen squadron
  • Air Force of the Polish Army
  • Soviet Air Force
  • SFR Yugoslav Air Force

Yakovlev Yak-3UA F-AZXZ/4 Soviet Air Force

Specifications (Yak-3)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 8.5 m (27 ft 10 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.2 m (30 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 2.39 m (7 ft 11 in)
  • Wing area: 14.85 m² (159.8 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 2,105 kg (4,640 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 2,692 kg (5,864 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Klimov VK-105PF-2 V-12 liquid-cooled piston engine, 970 kW (1,300 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 655 km/h (407 mph)
  • Range: 650 km (405 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 10,700 m (35,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 18.5 m/s (3,645 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 181 kg/m² (36.7 lb/ft²)
  • Power/mass: 0.36 kW/kg (0.22 hp/lb)

Armament

  • Guns:
    • 1 × 20 mm ShVAK cannon, with 150 rounds
    • 2 × 12.7 mm Berezin UBS machine guns with 170 rpg

Fieseler Fi 156 Storch

Fieseler Fi-156C-3 Storch F-AZRA/2E+RA Luftwaffe

The Fieseler Fi 156 Storch was a small German liaison aircraft built by Fieseler before and during World War II. It remains famous to this day for its excellent STOL (Short-Take-Off-and-Landing) performance.

  • Role: Reconnaissance & communications
  • National origin: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Fieseler/Morane-Saulnier
  • First flight: 24 May 1936
  • Introduction: 1937
  • Status: Privately owned, or in museums
  • Retired: Germany: 1945, France: 1970
  • Produced: 1937–1949 (1965 for the MS 500)
  • Number built: Over 2,900

Production per factory

  • Fieseler: 1.908
  • Morane-Saulnier: 784
  • Mraz: 78
  • Leichtbau: 73

Military operators

  • Bulgarian Air Force
  • Royal Khmer Air Force (Post war) and Khmer National Air Force
  • Air Force of the Independent State of Croatia
  • Czechoslovakian Air Force (Post war)
  • Egyptian Air Force
  • Finnish Air Force
  • French Air Force (Post war)
  • French Navy (Post war)
  • French Army (Post war)
  • Luftwaffe German Air Force)
  • Greek Air Force (Post war)
  • Royal Hungarian Air Force
  • Regia Aeronautica (Italian Air Force)
  • Royal Lao Air Force (Post war)
  • Royal Moroccan Air Force (Post war)
  • Royal Norwegian Air Force (Post war)
  • Polish Air Force (Post war)
  • Polish Navy (Post war)
  • Royal Romanian Air Force
  • Romanian Air Force (Post war)
  • Slovak Air Force (1939–1945)
  • Vietnam Air Force (Post war)
  • Soviet Air Force
  • Spanish Air Force
  • Royal Swedish Air Force
  • Swiss Air Force
  • Royal Air Force
  • Yugoslav Royal Air Force
  • SFR Yugoslav Air Force

Specifications (Fi 156)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 9.9 m (32 ft 6 in)
  • Wingspan: 14.3 m (46 ft 9 in)
  • Height: 3.1 m (10 ft 0 in)
  • Wing area: 26 m² (280 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 860 kg (1,900 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 1,260 kg (2,780 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Argus As 10 air-cooled inverted V8 engine, 180 kW (240 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 175 km/h (109 mph) at 300 m (1,000 ft)
  • Range: 380 km (210 nmi, 240 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 4,600 m (15,090 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 4.8 m/s (945 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 48.5 kg/m² (9.9 lb/ft²)
  • Power/mass: 143 W/kg (0.087 hp/lb)

Armament

  • Guns: MG 15 machine gun

Stampe-Vertongen SV.4

Stampe-Vertongen Formation La Ferte Alais Airshow 2014

The Stampe et Vertongen SV.4 (also known as the Stampe SV.4 or just Stampe) is a Belgian two-seat trainer/tourer biplane designed and built by Stampe et Vertongen.

  • Role: Two-seat Biplane Trainer
  • National origin: Belgium
  • Manufacturer: Stampe et Vertongen
  • Production line: Antwerp
  • First flight: 1933
  • Retired: 1975
  • Status: Privately owned, or in museums
  • Number built: 940

Stampe-Vertongen SV.4C F-GPPJ

Military operators

  • Belgian Air Force
  • Belgian Congo Force Publique
  • French Air Force
  • French Army
  • French Navy
  • Royal Air Force

 S.N.C.A.N. SV.4A F-BDME

Specifications (Post-War SV.4B)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1-2
  • Length: 6.80 m (22 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 8.385 m (27 ft 6 in)
  • Height: 2.775 m (9 ft 1 in)
  • Wing area: 18.06 m² (194.4 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 520 kg (1146 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 770 kg (1697 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × de Havilland Gipsy Major X or Blackburn Cirrus Major III, 145 hp (108 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 101 knots (188 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 75 knots (140 km/h)
  • Range: 420 km (260 statute miles)
  • Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,000 m)

Stampe-Vertongen SV.4C  F-BCXD

Stampe-Vertongen SV.4A F-BCGQ

Hawker Sea Fury

Hawker Sea Fury FB11 F-AZXJ/WH589/NW-115

The Hawker Sea Fury was a British fighter aircraft designed and manufactured by Hawker. It was the last propeller-driven fighter to serve with the Royal Navy, and also one of the fastest production single piston-engined aircraft ever built.

  • Role: Naval fighter-bomber
  • Manufacturer: Hawker
  • First flight: 1 September 1944 (Fury), 21 February 1945 (Sea Fury)
  • Introduction: October 1945 (FAA), 1947 (RCN)
  • Retired: 1953 (FAA), 1955 (RNVR), 1956 (RCN), 1957 (MLD), 1968 Burmese Air Force
  • Produced: 1945–55
  • Number built: 864
  • Developed from: Hawker Tempest

Military operators

  • Australia
  • Burma
  • Canada
  • Cuba
  • Egypt
  • Germany
  • Iraq
  • Netherlands
  • Pakistan
  • United Kindom

Hawker Sea Furry Mk.50 6-43 MLD (Royal Netherlands Navy)

Specifications (FB 11)

General characteristics

  • Crew: One
  • Length: 34 ft 8 in (10.56 m)
  • Wingspan: 38 ft 434 in (11.69 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 1012 in (4.84 m)
  • Wing area: 280 ft2 (26.01 m2)
  • Empty weight: 9,240 lb (4,191 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 12,350 lb (5,602 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 14,650 lb (6,645 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Bristol Centaurus 18 18-cylinder twin-row radial engine, 2,480 hp (1,850 kW) (take-off)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 460 mph (400 knots, 740 km/h) at 18,000 ft (5,500 m)
  • Range: 700 mi (609 nmi, 1,126 km) with internal fuel; 1,040 mi (904 nmi, 1,674 km) with two drop tanks
  • Service ceiling: 35,800 ft (10,910 m)
  • Rate of climb: 4,320 ft/min (21.9 m/s)

Armament

  • Guns: 4 × 20 mm (.79 in) Hispano Mk V cannon
  • Rockets: 12× 3 in (76.2 mm) rockets or
  • Bombs: 2,000 lb (907 kg) of bombs

 

North American T-6 Texan

North American T-6G Texan 115-237 OH

The North American Aviation T-6 Texan was a single-engined advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), United States Navy, Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth (Harvard) during World War II and into the 1970s.

  • Role: Trainer aircraft
  • National origin: United States
  • Manufacturer: North American Aviation
  • First flight: April 1, 1935
  • Introduction: 1935
  • Status: Retired from military service 1985 (Brazilian Air Force)
  • Number built: 15,495

North American AT-6B Texan as Zero F-AZZM/170

Specifications (T-6G)

General characteristics

  • Crew: two (student and instructor)
  • Length: 29 ft (8.84 m)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft (12.81 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 8 in (3.57 m)
  • Wing area: 253.7 ft² (23.6 m²)
  • Empty weight: 4,158 lb (1,886 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 5,617 lb (2,548 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney R-1340-AN-1 Wasp radial engine, 600 hp (450 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 208 mph at 5,000 ft (335 km/h at 1,500 m)
  • Cruise speed: 145 mph (233 km/h)
  • Range: 730 miles (1,175 km)
  • Service ceiling: 24,200 ft (7,400 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1200ft/min (6.1 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 22.2 lb/ft² (108 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.11 hp/lb (kW/kg)

Armament

  • Provision for up to 3× 0.30 in (7.62 mm) machine gun

North American P-51 Mustang

North American P-51D Mustang H-307 Royal Netherlands Air Force

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II, the Korean War and other conflicts. The Mustang was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation (NAA) in response to a specification issued directly to NAA by the British Purchasing Commission.

  • Role: Fighter
  • National origin: United States
  • Manufacturer: North American Aviation
  • First flight: October 26, 1940
  • Introduction: 1942
  • Status: Retired from military service 1984 (Dominican Air Force)
  • Number built: 15,000+

Specifications (P-51D Mustang)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 32 ft 3 in (9.83 m)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 0 in (11.28 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 4½ in (4.08 m:tail wheel on ground, vertical propeller blade.)
  • Wing area: 235 sq ft (21.83 m²)
  • Airfoil: NAA/NACA 45-100 / NAA/NACA 45-100
  • Empty weight: 7,635 lb (3,465 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 9,200 lb (4,175 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 12,100 lb (5,490 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Packard V-1650-7 liquid-cooled supercharged V-12, 1,490 hp (1,111 kW) at 3,000 rpm; 1,720 hp (1,282 kW) at WEP
  • Zero-lift drag coefficient: 0.0163
  • Drag area: 3.80 sqft (0.35 m²)
  • Aspect ratio: 5.83

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 437 mph (380 kn, 703 km/h) at 25,000 ft (7,600 m)
  • Cruise speed: 362 mph (315 kn, 580 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 100 mph (87 kn, 160 km/h)
  • Range: 1,650 mi (1,434 nmi, 2,755 km) with external tanks
  • Service ceiling: 41,900 ft (12,800 m)
  • Rate of climb: 3,200 ft/min (16.3 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 39 lb/sqft (192 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.18 hp/lb (300 W/kg)
  • Lift-to-drag ratio: 14.6
  • Recommended Mach limit 0.8

Armament

  • 6× 0.50 caliber (12.7mm) M2 Browning machine guns with 1,880 total rounds (400 rounds for each on the inner pair, and 270 rounds for each of the outer two pair)
  • 2× hardpoints for up to 2,000 lb (907 kg) of bombs
  • 6 or 10× T64 5.0 in (127 mm) H.V.A.R rockets (P-51D-25, P-51K-10 on)