JEROEN VOGELAAR: Aviation Photographs

Military aviation

Yakovlev Yak-3

Yakovlev Yak-3UA F-AZXZ/4 Soviet Air Force

The Yakovlev Yak-3 was a World War II Soviet fighter aircraft.

  • Role: Fighter
  • National origin: Russia
  • Manufacturer: Yakovlev
  • First flight: 12 April 1941
  • Introduction: 1944
  • Status: Privately owned, or in museums
  • Retired: 1952
  • Number built: 4.848

Yakovlev Yak-3UA F-AZLY/5 Soviet Air Force

Military operators

  • France, Normandie-Niemen squadron
  • Air Force of the Polish Army
  • Soviet Air Force
  • SFR Yugoslav Air Force

Yakovlev Yak-3UA F-AZXZ/4 Soviet Air Force

Specifications (Yak-3)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 8.5 m (27 ft 10 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.2 m (30 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 2.39 m (7 ft 11 in)
  • Wing area: 14.85 m² (159.8 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 2,105 kg (4,640 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 2,692 kg (5,864 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Klimov VK-105PF-2 V-12 liquid-cooled piston engine, 970 kW (1,300 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 655 km/h (407 mph)
  • Range: 650 km (405 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 10,700 m (35,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 18.5 m/s (3,645 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 181 kg/m² (36.7 lb/ft²)
  • Power/mass: 0.36 kW/kg (0.22 hp/lb)

Armament

  • Guns:
    • 1 × 20 mm ShVAK cannon, with 150 rounds
    • 2 × 12.7 mm Berezin UBS machine guns with 170 rpg

Pilatus PC-7

Pilatus PC-7 A-912/1 PC-7 Team Swiss Air Force

The Pilatus PC-7 Turbo Trainer is a low-wing tandem-seat training aircraft, manufactured by Pilatus Aircraft of Switzerland. The aircraft is capable of all basic training functions including aerobatics, instrument, tactical and night flying.

  • Role: Light Trainer aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Pilatus Aircraft
  • Designer: Pilatus Aircraft
  • First flight: 12 April 1966 (prototype), 18 August 1978 (production)
  • Produced: 1966 – present
  • Status: Active service
  • Number built: 618
  • Developed from: Pilatus P-3
  • Developed into: Pilatus PC-9

Variants

  • PC-7 : two-seat basic trainer aircraft, powered by PT6A-25A engine rated at 410 kW (550 shp).
  • PC-7 Mk II is a development of the PC-9’s airframe and avionics, retaining the PC-7’s wing to mount external stores. Powered by PT6A-25C of 522 kW (700 shp) rather than more powerful PT6A-62 of PC-9.
  • NCPC-7 : upgraded version of the standard PC-7 with fully IFR glass cockpit avionics, developed for the Swiss Air Force.

Military operators

  • National Air Force of Angola: 25
  • Austrian Air Force: 16
  • Bolivian Air Force: 24
  • Botswana Defence Force Air Wing: 7 PC-7, 5 PC-7 MK II
  • Royal Brunei Air Force: 4
  • Chad Air Force: 2
  • Chilean Navy: 10
  • Guatemalan Air Force: 12
  • Indian Air Force: 75
  • Iran Air Force: 35
  • Royal Malaysian Air Force:47
  • Mexican Air Force: 88
  • Myanmar Air Force: 17
  • Royal Netherlands Air Force: 13
  • South African Air Force: 60
  • Swiss Air Force: 40 (delivered from 1979), 28 NCPC-7s in service in 2011
  • United Arab Emirates Air Force: 7
  • Uruguayan Air Force: 6

Former military operators

  • Bophuthatswana Air Force: 3
  • French Air Force: 5
  • Iraq Air Force: 52
  • Nigerian Air Force: 2
  • Surinam Air Force: 3

Specifications (PC-7)

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two, student and instructor
  • Length: 9.78 m (32 ft 1 in)
  • Wingspan: 10.40 m (34 ft 1 in)
  • Height: 3.21 m (10 ft 6 in)
  • Wing area: 16.60 m² (179.0 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 1,330 kg (2,932 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 2,700 kg (5,952 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-25A turboprop, 410 kW (550 shp)

Performance

  • Never exceed speed: 500 km/h (270 knots, 310 mph)
  • Maximum speed: 412 km/h (222 knots, 256 mph) (max cruise at 6,100 m (20,000 ft))
  • Stall speed: 119 km/h (64 knots, 74 mph) flaps and gear down, power off
  • Range: 2,630 km (1,420 nmi, 1,634 mi) (cruise power, at 5,000 m (16,400 ft) – 20 min reserves)
  • Service ceiling: 10,060 m (33,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 10.9 m/s (2,150 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 114.5 kg/m² (23.44 lb/ft²)

Armament

  • Hardpoints: 6 × hardpoints for bombs and rockets with a capacity of 1,040 kg (2,294 lb)

 

Fieseler Fi 156 Storch

Fieseler Fi-156C-3 Storch F-AZRA/2E+RA Luftwaffe

The Fieseler Fi 156 Storch was a small German liaison aircraft built by Fieseler before and during World War II. It remains famous to this day for its excellent STOL (Short-Take-Off-and-Landing) performance.

  • Role: Reconnaissance & communications
  • National origin: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Fieseler/Morane-Saulnier
  • First flight: 24 May 1936
  • Introduction: 1937
  • Status: Privately owned, or in museums
  • Retired: Germany: 1945, France: 1970
  • Produced: 1937–1949 (1965 for the MS 500)
  • Number built: Over 2,900

Production per factory

  • Fieseler: 1.908
  • Morane-Saulnier: 784
  • Mraz: 78
  • Leichtbau: 73

Military operators

  • Bulgarian Air Force
  • Royal Khmer Air Force (Post war) and Khmer National Air Force
  • Air Force of the Independent State of Croatia
  • Czechoslovakian Air Force (Post war)
  • Egyptian Air Force
  • Finnish Air Force
  • French Air Force (Post war)
  • French Navy (Post war)
  • French Army (Post war)
  • Luftwaffe German Air Force)
  • Greek Air Force (Post war)
  • Royal Hungarian Air Force
  • Regia Aeronautica (Italian Air Force)
  • Royal Lao Air Force (Post war)
  • Royal Moroccan Air Force (Post war)
  • Royal Norwegian Air Force (Post war)
  • Polish Air Force (Post war)
  • Polish Navy (Post war)
  • Royal Romanian Air Force
  • Romanian Air Force (Post war)
  • Slovak Air Force (1939–1945)
  • Vietnam Air Force (Post war)
  • Soviet Air Force
  • Spanish Air Force
  • Royal Swedish Air Force
  • Swiss Air Force
  • Royal Air Force
  • Yugoslav Royal Air Force
  • SFR Yugoslav Air Force

Specifications (Fi 156)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 9.9 m (32 ft 6 in)
  • Wingspan: 14.3 m (46 ft 9 in)
  • Height: 3.1 m (10 ft 0 in)
  • Wing area: 26 m² (280 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 860 kg (1,900 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 1,260 kg (2,780 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Argus As 10 air-cooled inverted V8 engine, 180 kW (240 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 175 km/h (109 mph) at 300 m (1,000 ft)
  • Range: 380 km (210 nmi, 240 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 4,600 m (15,090 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 4.8 m/s (945 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 48.5 kg/m² (9.9 lb/ft²)
  • Power/mass: 143 W/kg (0.087 hp/lb)

Armament

  • Guns: MG 15 machine gun

Stampe-Vertongen SV.4

Stampe-Vertongen Formation La Ferte Alais Airshow 2014

The Stampe et Vertongen SV.4 (also known as the Stampe SV.4 or just Stampe) is a Belgian two-seat trainer/tourer biplane designed and built by Stampe et Vertongen.

  • Role: Two-seat Biplane Trainer
  • National origin: Belgium
  • Manufacturer: Stampe et Vertongen
  • Production line: Antwerp
  • First flight: 1933
  • Retired: 1975
  • Status: Privately owned, or in museums
  • Number built: 940

Stampe-Vertongen SV.4C F-GPPJ

Military operators

  • Belgian Air Force
  • Belgian Congo Force Publique
  • French Air Force
  • French Army
  • French Navy
  • Royal Air Force

 S.N.C.A.N. SV.4A F-BDME

Specifications (Post-War SV.4B)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1-2
  • Length: 6.80 m (22 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 8.385 m (27 ft 6 in)
  • Height: 2.775 m (9 ft 1 in)
  • Wing area: 18.06 m² (194.4 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 520 kg (1146 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 770 kg (1697 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × de Havilland Gipsy Major X or Blackburn Cirrus Major III, 145 hp (108 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 101 knots (188 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 75 knots (140 km/h)
  • Range: 420 km (260 statute miles)
  • Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,000 m)

Stampe-Vertongen SV.4C  F-BCXD

Stampe-Vertongen SV.4A F-BCGQ

Hawker Sea Fury

Hawker Sea Fury FB11 F-AZXJ/WH589/NW-115

The Hawker Sea Fury was a British fighter aircraft designed and manufactured by Hawker. It was the last propeller-driven fighter to serve with the Royal Navy, and also one of the fastest production single piston-engined aircraft ever built.

  • Role: Naval fighter-bomber
  • Manufacturer: Hawker
  • First flight: 1 September 1944 (Fury), 21 February 1945 (Sea Fury)
  • Introduction: October 1945 (FAA), 1947 (RCN)
  • Retired: 1953 (FAA), 1955 (RNVR), 1956 (RCN), 1957 (MLD), 1968 Burmese Air Force
  • Produced: 1945–55
  • Number built: 864
  • Developed from: Hawker Tempest

Military operators

  • Australia
  • Burma
  • Canada
  • Cuba
  • Egypt
  • Germany
  • Iraq
  • Netherlands
  • Pakistan
  • United Kindom

Hawker Sea Furry Mk.50 6-43 MLD (Royal Netherlands Navy)

Specifications (FB 11)

General characteristics

  • Crew: One
  • Length: 34 ft 8 in (10.56 m)
  • Wingspan: 38 ft 434 in (11.69 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 1012 in (4.84 m)
  • Wing area: 280 ft2 (26.01 m2)
  • Empty weight: 9,240 lb (4,191 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 12,350 lb (5,602 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 14,650 lb (6,645 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Bristol Centaurus 18 18-cylinder twin-row radial engine, 2,480 hp (1,850 kW) (take-off)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 460 mph (400 knots, 740 km/h) at 18,000 ft (5,500 m)
  • Range: 700 mi (609 nmi, 1,126 km) with internal fuel; 1,040 mi (904 nmi, 1,674 km) with two drop tanks
  • Service ceiling: 35,800 ft (10,910 m)
  • Rate of climb: 4,320 ft/min (21.9 m/s)

Armament

  • Guns: 4 × 20 mm (.79 in) Hispano Mk V cannon
  • Rockets: 12× 3 in (76.2 mm) rockets or
  • Bombs: 2,000 lb (907 kg) of bombs

 

North American T-6 Texan

North American T-6G Texan 115-237 OH

The North American Aviation T-6 Texan was a single-engined advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), United States Navy, Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth (Harvard) during World War II and into the 1970s.

  • Role: Trainer aircraft
  • National origin: United States
  • Manufacturer: North American Aviation
  • First flight: April 1, 1935
  • Introduction: 1935
  • Status: Retired from military service 1985 (Brazilian Air Force)
  • Number built: 15,495

North American AT-6B Texan as Zero F-AZZM/170

Specifications (T-6G)

General characteristics

  • Crew: two (student and instructor)
  • Length: 29 ft (8.84 m)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft (12.81 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 8 in (3.57 m)
  • Wing area: 253.7 ft² (23.6 m²)
  • Empty weight: 4,158 lb (1,886 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 5,617 lb (2,548 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney R-1340-AN-1 Wasp radial engine, 600 hp (450 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 208 mph at 5,000 ft (335 km/h at 1,500 m)
  • Cruise speed: 145 mph (233 km/h)
  • Range: 730 miles (1,175 km)
  • Service ceiling: 24,200 ft (7,400 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1200ft/min (6.1 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 22.2 lb/ft² (108 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.11 hp/lb (kW/kg)

Armament

  • Provision for up to 3× 0.30 in (7.62 mm) machine gun

North American P-51 Mustang

North American P-51D Mustang H-307 Royal Netherlands Air Force

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II, the Korean War and other conflicts. The Mustang was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation (NAA) in response to a specification issued directly to NAA by the British Purchasing Commission.

  • Role: Fighter
  • National origin: United States
  • Manufacturer: North American Aviation
  • First flight: October 26, 1940
  • Introduction: 1942
  • Status: Retired from military service 1984 (Dominican Air Force)
  • Number built: 15,000+

Specifications (P-51D Mustang)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 32 ft 3 in (9.83 m)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 0 in (11.28 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 4½ in (4.08 m:tail wheel on ground, vertical propeller blade.)
  • Wing area: 235 sq ft (21.83 m²)
  • Airfoil: NAA/NACA 45-100 / NAA/NACA 45-100
  • Empty weight: 7,635 lb (3,465 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 9,200 lb (4,175 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 12,100 lb (5,490 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Packard V-1650-7 liquid-cooled supercharged V-12, 1,490 hp (1,111 kW) at 3,000 rpm; 1,720 hp (1,282 kW) at WEP
  • Zero-lift drag coefficient: 0.0163
  • Drag area: 3.80 sqft (0.35 m²)
  • Aspect ratio: 5.83

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 437 mph (380 kn, 703 km/h) at 25,000 ft (7,600 m)
  • Cruise speed: 362 mph (315 kn, 580 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 100 mph (87 kn, 160 km/h)
  • Range: 1,650 mi (1,434 nmi, 2,755 km) with external tanks
  • Service ceiling: 41,900 ft (12,800 m)
  • Rate of climb: 3,200 ft/min (16.3 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 39 lb/sqft (192 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.18 hp/lb (300 W/kg)
  • Lift-to-drag ratio: 14.6
  • Recommended Mach limit 0.8

Armament

  • 6× 0.50 caliber (12.7mm) M2 Browning machine guns with 1,880 total rounds (400 rounds for each on the inner pair, and 270 rounds for each of the outer two pair)
  • 2× hardpoints for up to 2,000 lb (907 kg) of bombs
  • 6 or 10× T64 5.0 in (127 mm) H.V.A.R rockets (P-51D-25, P-51K-10 on)

Bell OH-58 Kiowa

Bell OH-58B Kiowa 3C-OC Austrian Armed Forces

The Bell OH-58 Kiowa is a family of single-engine, single-rotor, military helicopters used for observation, utility, and direct fire support.

  • Role: Observation/scout helicopter
  • National origin: United States of America
  • Manufacturer: Bell Helicopter
  • First flight: Bell 206A: 10 January 1966, OH-58D: 6 October 1983, OH-58F: 26 April 2013
  • Introduction: 1969
  • Status: In service
  • Produced: 1966–1989
  • Number built: 2,200
  • Developed from: Bell 206

Military operators

  • Austrian Armed Forces
  • Republic of China Army
  • Dominican Air Force
  • Royal Saudi Land Forces
  • Turkish Army
  • United States Army

Former operators

  • Australian Army
  • Canadian Forces

Specifications

OH-58A

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1 pilot, 2 pilots, or 1 pilot and 1 observer
  • Length: 32 ft 2 in (9.80 m)
  • Rotor diameter: 35 ft 4 in (10.77 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 7 in (2.92 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,583 lb (718 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 3,000 lb (1,360 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Allison T63-A-700 turboshaft, 317 shp (236 kW)
  • Fuselage length: 34 ft 4.5 in (10.48 m)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 120 knots (222 km/h, 138 mph)
  • Cruise speed: 102 knots (188 km/h, 117 mph)
  • Range: 299 mi (481 km, 260 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 19,000 ft (5,800 m)

Armament

  • Guns: M134 six-barreled 7.62mm minigun mounted on the M27 Armament Subsystem
    OR
    M129 grenade launcher mounted on the XM8 Armament Subsystem

OH-58D

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2 pilots
  • Length: 42 ft 2 in (12.85 m)
  • Main rotor diameter: 35 ft 0 in (10.67 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 1058 in (3.93 m)
  • Main rotor area: 14.83 ft2 (1.38 m2)
  • Empty weight: 3,829 lb (1,737 kg)
  • Gross weight: 5,500 lb (2,495 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Rolls-Royce T703-AD-700A or 250-C30R3 turboshaft, 650 hp (485 kW) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 149 mph (240 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 127 mph (204 km/h)
  • Range: 161 miles (556 km)
  • Endurance: 2.0 hours
  • Service ceiling: 15,000 ft (4,575 m)

Armament

  • Each pylon (two total) can carry one of the following:
  • 1x M3P (or M296) .50 cal (12.7 mm) machine gun
  • 1x LAU-68 rocket launcher w/ seven 2.75″ Hydra 70 rockets
  • 2x AGM-114 Hellfire missiles

OH-58F

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2 pilots
  • Empty weight: 3,496 lb (1,586 kg)
  • Gross weight: 5,500 lb (2,495 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Rolls-Royce 250-C30R3 turboshaft, 650 hp (485 kW) each

Performance

  • Cruise speed: 109 (with weapons) mph (176 km/h)
  • Range: 161 miles (260 km)
  • Endurance: 2.0 hours

Armament

  • Each pylon (two total) can carry one of the following:
  • 1x M3P .50 cal (12.7mm) machine gun
  • 1x M260 rocket launcher w/ seven 2.75″ Hydra 70 rockets
  • 2x AGM-114 Hellfire missiles
  • 2x JAGM (Joint Air-to-Ground Missile)

Naval Aircraft Factory N3N

Naval Aircraft Factory N3N-3 F-AZNF/69

The Naval Aircraft Factory N3N was a United States two tandem-seat, open cockpit, primary training biplane aircraft. The N3N was the last biplane in US military service – the last (used by the U.S. Naval Academy for aviation familiarization) were retired in 1961.

  • Role: Biplane Trainer
  • National origin: United States of America
  • Manufacturer: Naval Aircraft Factory
  • Production line: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • First flight: August 1935
  • Number built: 997 (180 N3N-1 and 816 N3N-3)

Specifications (N3N-3)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 25 ft 6 in (7.77 m)
  • Wingspan: 34 ft 0 in (10.36 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 10 in (3.3 m)
  • Wing area: 305 ft2 (28.3 m2)
  • Empty weight: 2,090 lb (948 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,792 lb (1,266 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Wright R-760-2 Whirlwind radial, 235 hp (175 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 126 mph (203 km/h)
  • Range: 470 miles (756 km)
  • Service ceiling: 15,200 ft (4,635 m)
  • Rate of climb: 900 ft/min ( m/s)

Communications were done by the instructor through a speaking tube to the aft-seated student. Communications back were agreed-upon gestures.

Breitling Wingwalkers

Boeing PT-13D Kaydet Breitling Wingwalkers

AeroSuperBatics Ltd is a British aerobatics and wingwalking team. As of 2011, they perform as the Breitling Wingwalkers following a sponsorship agreement with the Swiss watch manufacturer Breitling.

AeroSuperBatics was founded in 1989 by Vic Norman, a veteran aerobatics pilot. It operates four Boeing-Stearman Model 75 biplanes and employs five pilots. The team’s shows consist of two or four planes performing aerobatic manoeuvres while female athletes, attached to a post above the wings, engage in acrobatics.

  • Active: 2011–present with sponsor Breitling
  • Country: United Kingdom
  • Branch: AeroSuperBatics Ltd
  • Home base: RFC Rendcomb Aerodrome, UK
  • Role: Civilian aerobatics and wingwalking team
  • Size: 4 aircraft, 2 or 4 flies in airshows
  • Colors: Orange and white
  • Website: http://www.aerosuperbatics.com

Aircraft