JEROEN VOGELAAR: Aviation Photographs

Trainer Aircraft

Nord 3202 Master

Nord 3202 Master F-AZIY/ZIY ex French Army

The Nord Aviation 3202 Master was a 1950s French military trainer aircraft designed and built by Nord Aviation to meet a French Army requirement for a two-seat basic trainer, as a replacement for the biplane Stampe SV.4.

  • Role: Two-seat trainer
  • National origin: France
  • Manufacturer: Nord Aviation
  • First flight: 17 April 1957
  • Retired: 1978
  • Status: Privately owned, or in museums
  • Operator: French Army
  • Number built: 101

Specifications (N 3202B)

General characteristics

  • Crew: two, pilot and instructor
  • Length: 8.12 m (26 ft 8 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.5 m (31 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 2.82 m (9 ft 3 in)
  • Wing area: 16.25 m² (175 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 860 kg (1,895 lb)
  • Maximum takeoff: 1,220 kg (2,690 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Potez 4D34, 190 kW (260 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 260 km/h (160 mph)
  • Range: 1,000 km (620 mi)
  • Service ceiling: m ( ft)
  • Rate of climb: m/min ( ft/min)

 

Piper PA-18 Super Cub

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub HB-PAV/V-654 Swiss Air Force

The Piper PA-18 Super Cub is a two-seat, single-engine monoplane. Introduced in 1949 by Piper Aircraft.

  • Role: Light utility aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Piper Aircraft
  • First flight: 1949
  • Produced: 1949-1983; 1988-1994
  • Status: Active service
  • Number built: 15.000
  • Developed from: Piper PA-11

Military operators

  • Austrian Air Force
  • Belgian Army
  • Federal German Luftwaffe
  • Imperial Iranian Air Force
  • Italian Army
  • Israeli Air Force
  • Force Aérienne Katangaise
  • Netherlands Army
  • Nicaraguan Air Force
  • Japanese Army
  • Royal Norwegian Air Force
  • Portuguese Army
  • Portuguese Air Force
  • Swedish Army
  • Swiss Air Force
  • Turkish Army
  • Uganda
  • Uruguay
  • United States Air Force
  • United States Army

Specifications (PA-18-150 landplane)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 1 passenger
  • Length: 22 ft 7 in (6.88 m)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 2½ in (10.73 m)
  • Height: 6 ft 8½ in (2.02 m)
  • Wing area: 178.5 sq ft (16.58 m²)
  • Airfoil: USA 35B
  • Aspect ratio: 7:1
  • Empty weight: 930 lb (422 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 1,750 lb (794 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-320 air-cooled flat four, 150 hp (112 kW)

Performance

  • Never exceed speed: 132 knots (246 km/h, 153 mph)
  • Maximum speed: 113 knots (208 km/h, 130 mph) at sea level
  • Cruise speed: 100 kts (185 km/h, 115 mph) (75% power)
  • Stall speed: 38 knots (69 km/h, 43 mph) flaps down
  • Range: 399 nmi (735 km, 460 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 19,000 ft (5,595 m)

 

Pilatus PC-7

Pilatus PC-7 A-912/1 PC-7 Team Swiss Air Force

The Pilatus PC-7 Turbo Trainer is a low-wing tandem-seat training aircraft, manufactured by Pilatus Aircraft of Switzerland. The aircraft is capable of all basic training functions including aerobatics, instrument, tactical and night flying.

  • Role: Light Trainer aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Pilatus Aircraft
  • Designer: Pilatus Aircraft
  • First flight: 12 April 1966 (prototype), 18 August 1978 (production)
  • Produced: 1966 – present
  • Status: Active service
  • Number built: 618
  • Developed from: Pilatus P-3
  • Developed into: Pilatus PC-9

Variants

  • PC-7 : two-seat basic trainer aircraft, powered by PT6A-25A engine rated at 410 kW (550 shp).
  • PC-7 Mk II is a development of the PC-9’s airframe and avionics, retaining the PC-7’s wing to mount external stores. Powered by PT6A-25C of 522 kW (700 shp) rather than more powerful PT6A-62 of PC-9.
  • NCPC-7 : upgraded version of the standard PC-7 with fully IFR glass cockpit avionics, developed for the Swiss Air Force.

Military operators

  • National Air Force of Angola: 25
  • Austrian Air Force: 16
  • Bolivian Air Force: 24
  • Botswana Defence Force Air Wing: 7 PC-7, 5 PC-7 MK II
  • Royal Brunei Air Force: 4
  • Chad Air Force: 2
  • Chilean Navy: 10
  • Guatemalan Air Force: 12
  • Indian Air Force: 75
  • Iran Air Force: 35
  • Royal Malaysian Air Force:47
  • Mexican Air Force: 88
  • Myanmar Air Force: 17
  • Royal Netherlands Air Force: 13
  • South African Air Force: 60
  • Swiss Air Force: 40 (delivered from 1979), 28 NCPC-7s in service in 2011
  • United Arab Emirates Air Force: 7
  • Uruguayan Air Force: 6

Former military operators

  • Bophuthatswana Air Force: 3
  • French Air Force: 5
  • Iraq Air Force: 52
  • Nigerian Air Force: 2
  • Surinam Air Force: 3

Specifications (PC-7)

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two, student and instructor
  • Length: 9.78 m (32 ft 1 in)
  • Wingspan: 10.40 m (34 ft 1 in)
  • Height: 3.21 m (10 ft 6 in)
  • Wing area: 16.60 m² (179.0 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 1,330 kg (2,932 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 2,700 kg (5,952 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-25A turboprop, 410 kW (550 shp)

Performance

  • Never exceed speed: 500 km/h (270 knots, 310 mph)
  • Maximum speed: 412 km/h (222 knots, 256 mph) (max cruise at 6,100 m (20,000 ft))
  • Stall speed: 119 km/h (64 knots, 74 mph) flaps and gear down, power off
  • Range: 2,630 km (1,420 nmi, 1,634 mi) (cruise power, at 5,000 m (16,400 ft) – 20 min reserves)
  • Service ceiling: 10,060 m (33,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 10.9 m/s (2,150 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 114.5 kg/m² (23.44 lb/ft²)

Armament

  • Hardpoints: 6 × hardpoints for bombs and rockets with a capacity of 1,040 kg (2,294 lb)

 

BAE Systems Hawk

British Aerospace Hawk 51 HW-334 3 Finnish Air Force

The BAE Systems Hawk is a British single-engine, jet-powered advanced trainer aircraft. A derivative of the Hawk was selected by the United States Navy as their new trainer aircraft. Designated the McDonnell Douglas T-45 Goshawk. The most famous users of the Hawk are the Red Arrows aerobatic team, who adopted the plane in 1979.

  • Role: Advanced jet trainer and light attack aircraft
  • Manufacturer: BAE Systems
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • First flight: 21 August 1974
  • Introduction: 1976
  • Produced: 1974–present
  • Number built: 1,000+
  • Status: In service

Military operators

  • Royal Australian Air Force – 33 Hawk 127
  • Royal Bahraini Air Force – 6 Hawk 129
  • Royal Canadian Air Force – 16 Hawk 115
  • Finnish Air Force – 75 Hawks (50 Mk.51, 7 Mk.51A, 18 Mk.66
  • Indian Air Force – 66 Hawk 132 (total 106 ordered for IAF)
  • Indian Navy – 8 Hawk 132 (total 17 ordered)
  • Indonesian Air Force – 38 Hawk 53/109/209
  • Kuwait Air Force – 10 Hawk 64
  • Royal Malaysian Air Force – 19 Hawk 108/208
  • Royal Air Force of Oman – 15 Hawk 103/203
  • Royal Saudi Air Force – 45 Hawk 65
  • South African Air Force – 24 Hawk 120
  • Royal Air Force – 81 Hawk T1/28 Hawk T2
  • Royal Navy – 17 Hawk T1
  • United Arab Emirates Air Force – 36 Hawk 61/63/102

Former operators

  • Kenya Air Force – 7 Hawk 52, out of service and retired as of 2012
  • Republic of Korea Air Force introduced 20 T-59 (Hawk 67) in September 1992. Retired from service in 2013
  • Swiss Air Force: 20 Hawk Mk. 66 were bought in 1992 but decommissioned in 2002, of which 18 were sold to Finland in June 2007
  • Air Force of Zimbabwe – 12 Hawk 60 retired as of 2011 because of lack of spares and lack of BAE support

Specifications (Hawk 128)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2: student, instructor
  • Length: 12.43 m (40 ft 9 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.94 m (32 ft 7 in)
  • Height: 3.98 m (13 ft 1 in)
  • Wing area: 16.70 m2 (179.64 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 4,480 kg (9,880 lb)
  • Useful load: 3,000 kg (6,600 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 9,100 kg (20,000 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1× Rolls-Royce Adour Mk. 951 turbofan with FADEC, 29 kN (6,500 lbf) 29 kN

Performance

  • Maximum speed: Mach 0.84 (1,028 km/h, 638 mph) at altitude
  • Range: 2,520 km (1,360 nmi, 1,565 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 13,565 m (44,500 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 47 m/s (9,300 ft/min)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.65

Armament

Note: all armament is optional.
  • 1× 30 mm ADEN cannon, in centreline pod
  • Up to 6,800 lb (3,085 kg) of weapons on five hardpoints, including:
    • 4× AIM-9 Sidewinder or ASRAAM on wing pylons and wingtip rails
  • 1,500 lb (680 kg), limited to one centreline and two wing pylons (Hawk T1)

Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet

Dassault Dornier Alpha Jet E F-UHRW/E166/3 Patrouille de France

The Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet is a light attack jet and advanced trainer aircraft co-manufactured by Dornier of Germany and Dassault-Breguet of France. The Patrouille de France, air demonstration team of the French Air Force, fly the Alpha Jet.

  • Role: Advanced jet trainer and light attack aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Dassault/Dornier
  • National origin: France/Germany
  • First flight: 26 October 1973
  • Introduction: 4 November 1977
  • Produced: 1973-1991
  • Number built: 480
  • Status: Operational

Military Operators

  • Belgian Air Component (Alpha Jet E) – 26 based in France
  • Cameroon Air Force (Alpha Jet MS2) – 27
  • Canada, Discovery Air Defence Services – 16 “Top Aces”(former Luftwaffe Alpha Jet Aircraft)
  • Egypt Air Force (Alpha Jet MS2 and E) – 14 MS2 and 40 E (MS1)
  • French Air Force (Alpha Jet E) – 99
  • Royal Moroccan Air Force (Alpha Jet E) – 24
  • Nigerian Air Force (Alpha Jet E) – 24
  • Portuguese Air Force – 50 (Alpha Jet A, former Luftwaffe aircraft)
  • Qatar Emiri Air Force (Alpha Jet E) – six
  • Royal Thai Air Force (25 Alpha Jet A – former Luftwaffe aircraft)
  • Togo Air Force – 12 (Alpha Jet E)
  • United Kingdom, QinetiQ – six (Alpha Jet A, former Luftwaffe aircraft)

Former military operators

  • German Air Force – 93 (Alpha Jet A)
  • Côte d’Ivoire Air Force (Alpha Jet E) – seven

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: two
  • Length: 13.23 m (43 ft 5 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.11 m (29 ft 10¾ in)
  • Height: 4.19 m (13 ft 9 in)
  • Wing area: 17.50 m² (188.4 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 3,515 kg (7,750 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 5,000 kg (11,000 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 7,500 kg (16,535 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × SNECMA Turbomeca Larzac 04-C5 turbofans, 13.24 kN (2,976 lbf) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 1,000 km/h (540 kn, 621 mph) at sea level
  • Stall speed: 167 km/h (90 knots, 104 mph) (flaps and undercarriage down)
  • Combat radius: 610 km (329 nmi, 379 mi) lo-lo-lo profile, gun pod, underwing weapons and two drop tanks
  • Ferry range: 2,940 km (1,586 nmi, 1,827 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 14,630 m (48,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 57 m/s (11,220 ft/min)

Armament

  • Guns: One 27 mm Mauser BK-27 Revolver cannon in centreline gun pack with 120 rounds or one 30 mm DEFA in centerline pod with 150 rounds
  • Rockets: Two Matra rocket pods with eighteen SNEB 68 mm rockets each or two CRV7 rocket pods with nineteen 70 mm rockets each
  • Missiles: Two AIM-9 Sidewinders; two Matra Magic IIs; two AGM-65 Mavericks;
  • Bombs: 2,500 kg (5,500 lb) of payload on five external hardpoints, including a variety of bombs (such as the Hunting BL755 cluster bomb) or Drop tanks for extended range.

 

Pilatus PC-9

Pilatus PC-9 HB-HPJ Pilatus Aircraft

The Pilatus PC-9 is a single-engine, low-wing tandem-seat turboprop training aircraft manufactured by Pilatus Aircraft of Switzerland.

  • Role: Advanced Trainer aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Pilatus Aircraft
  • Designer: Pilatus Aircraft
  • First flight: 7 May 1984
  • Introduction: 1984 – present
  • Status: Active service
  • Number built: 265
  • Developed from: Pilatus PC-7
  • Developed into: T-6 Texan II

Pilatus PC-9 HB-HPJ Demo Pilatus Aircraft

Military operators

  • Royal Australian Air Force
  • Bulgarian Air Force
  • Croatian Air Force
  • Chadian Air Force
  • Cyprus Air Forces
  • Irish Air Corps
  • Mexican Air Force
  • Myanmar Air Force
  • Royal Air Force of Oman
  • Royal Saudi Air Force
  • Slovenian Air Force and Air Defence
  • Swiss Air Force
  • Royal Thai Air Force

Former military operators

  • National Air Force of Angola
  • Luftwaffe
  • United States Army

Pilatus PC-9 HB-HPJ Demo Pilatus Aircraft

Specifications (PC-9M)

General characteristics

  • Crew: one or two pilots
  • Length: 10.14 m (33 ft 3 in)
  • Wingspan: 10.125 m (33 ft 3 in)
  • Height: 3.26 m (10 ft 8 in)
  • Wing area: 16.29 m2 (175.3 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 1,725 kg (3,803 lb)
  • Gross weight: 2,350 kg (5,181 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 3,200 kg (7,055 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-62 turboprop, 857 kW (1,149 hp) flat-rated at 708 kW (950 shp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 593 km/h (368 mph; 320 kn)
  • Cruising speed: 556 km/h (345 mph; 300 kn) at 7,620 m (25,000 ft)
  • Stall speed: 143 km/h (89 mph; 77 kn) EAS flaps and gear up, 128 km/h (80 mph; 69 kn) flaps and gear down
  • Range: 1,537 km (955 mi; 830 nmi)
  • Endurance: 4 hr 30 min
  • Service ceiling: 11,580 m (37,992 ft)
  • g limits: + 7.0 g to −3.5 g
  • Rate of climb: 20.8 m/s (4,090 ft/min)
  • Take-off distance over 50 ft (15 m) obstacle at sea level: 1,280 ft (391 m)
  • Landing distance over 50 ft (15 m) obstacle at sea level: 2,295 ft (700 m)

Armament

  • Hardpoints: Three hardpoints under each wing, inner two rated at 250 kg (550 lb), outer rated at 110 kg (240 lb)

Pilatus PC-9 C-406 Zielflugstaffe Swiss Air Force

Aero L-39 Albatros

Aero L-39C Albatros ES-YLR/0

  • Role: Military trainer aircraft/Light ground-attack aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Aero Vodochody
  • National origin: Czechoslovakia
  • First flight: 4 November 1968
  • Introduction: 28 March 1972 with the Czechoslovak Air Force
  • Status: 2,800 still in use in various air forces
  • Produced: 1971–1999
  • Developed from: Aero L-29 Delfín

Variants

  • Aero L-59 Super Albatros
  • Aero L-159 Alca

Military Operators

  • Soviet Air Force
  • Czechoslovak Air Force
  • Libyan Air Force
  • Syrian Air Force
  • Breitling Jet Team

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 12.13 m (39 ft 9½ in)
  • Wingspan: 9.46 m (31 ft 0½ in)
  • Height: 4.77 m (15 ft 7¾ in)
  • Wing area: 18.8 m² (202 ft²)
  • Airfoil: NACA 64A012 mod
  • Empty weight: 3,455 kg (7,617 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 4,700 kg (10,362 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Ivchenko AI-25TL turbofan, 16.87 kN (3,792 lbf)

Performance

  • Never exceed speed: Mach 0.80 (609 mph, 980 km/h)
  • Maximum speed: 750 km/h (405 knots, 466 mph) at 5,000 m (16,400 ft)
  • Range: 1,100 km (593 nmi, 683 mi) (internal fuel)
    • 1,750 km, (944 nmi, 1,087 mi) (internal and external fuel)
  • Endurance: 2 hr 30 min (internal fuel), 3 hr 50 min (internal and external fuel)
  • Service ceiling: 11,000 m (36,100 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 13.5 m/s (4,130 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 250.0 kg/m² (51.3 lb/ft²)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.37
  • Climb to 5,000 m (16,400 ft): 5 min
  • Take-off roll: 530 m (1,740 ft)
  • Landing roll: 650 m (2,140 ft)

Armament

  • Up to 284 kg (626 lb) of stores on two external hardpoints
  • 2× wingtip fuel tanks

CASA C-101 Aviojet

CASA C-101EB Aviojet E25-08 79-08 Spanish Air Force

The CASA C-101 Aviojet is a low-wing single engine jet-powered advanced trainer and light attack aircraft. It remains in service in the Spanish Air Force and some other countries; it is also flown by the Patrulla Aguila aerobatics team.

  • Role: Advanced jet trainer and light attack aircraft
  • Manufacturer: CASA
  • National origin: Spain
  • First flight: 27 June 1977
  • Introduction: 17 March 1980
  • Number built: 166
  • Status: Operational

Military Operators

  • Spanish Air Force
  • Chilean Air Force
  • Honduran Air Force
  • Jordanian Air Force

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two (student and instructor)
  • Length: 12.25 m (40 ft 2 in)
  • Wingspan: 10.60 m (34 ft 9 in)
  • Height: 4.25 m (13 ft 11 in)
  • Wing area: 20.0 m² (215 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 3,800 kg (8,380 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 5,000 kg (11,000 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 5,600 kg (12,300 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Garrett TFE731-2-2J turbofan engine, 15.8 kN (3,550 lbf)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 770 km/h (417 knots, 480 mph)
  • Range: 4000 km (2160 nm, 2485 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 12,500 m (41,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 1,490 m/min (4,900 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 250 kg/m² (52 lb/ft²)
  • Thrust/weight: 1:3.2 (3.16 N/kg)
  • Maximum G: +7.5 -3.9

Armament

  • 1 × 30 mm DEFA cannon or 2 × 12.7 mm (.50 cal) M3 machine guns
  • 6 × underwing pylons, up to 2,220 kg (4,890 lb) disposable stores
  • 2 × Rafael Shafrir 2 (A-36 “Toqui”)

Pilatus PC-21

Pilatus PC-21's HB-HWS and HB-HWT Royal Saudi Air Force

The Pilatus PC-21 is a single-turboprop, low wing swept monoplane advanced trainer with a stepped tandem cockpit manufactured by Pilatus Aircraft of Switzerland.

  • Role: Advanced Trainer aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Pilatus Aircraft
  • Designer: Pilatus Aircraft
  • First flight: 1 July 2002
  • Introduction: April 2008
  • Status: Active service
  • Number built: 100 February 20, 2015
  • Developed from: Pilatus PC-7, Pilatus PC-9

Pilatus PC-21 HB-HZD Pilatus Aircraft Prototype

Military Operators

  • Royal Qatar Air Force
  • Royal Saudi Air Force
  • Republic of Singapore Air Force
  • Swiss Air Force
  • United Arab Emirates Air Force

Pilatus PC-21 A-103 Pilotenschule Swiss Air Force

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two (student & instructor)
  • Length: 11.233 m (36 ft 11 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.108 m (29 ft 11 in)
  • Height: 3.749 m (12 ft 4 in)
  • Wing area: 15.221 m² (163.848 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 2,270 kg (5,005 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 3,100 kg (aerobatic) / 4,250 kg (utility) (6,834 lb (aerobatic) / 9,370 lb (utility))
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-68B Turboprop engine, 1,200 kW (1,600 shp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 685 km/h (370 knots, 428 mph)
  • Stall speed: 170 km/h (92 knots, 106.25 mph) gear and flaps up (20 km/h less with flaps and gear down)
  • Range: 1,333 km (720 nm, 828 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 11,580 m (38,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 1,219 m/min (4,000 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 208 kg/m² (42.7 lb/ft²)
  • Power/mass: 0.39 kW/kg (0.23 hp/lb)

Armament

  • Hardpoints: Provisions provided for 4× under-wing and 1× centerline external store stations, capable of mounting up to 1,150 kg (2,540 lb) of payload of air-to-ground weapons to operate in the Counter-insurgency role.